Skip to main content

About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
CSPAN 10
CNN 4
CSPAN2 4
CNNW 3
KGO (ABC) 2
MSNBCW 2
WTTG 2
FBC 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
MSNBC 1
WBFF (FOX) 1
LANGUAGE
English 34
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
towns and cities from the southern plains north to illinois. >> and developing overnight, a hot air balloon packed with tourists takes a deadly plunge overseas. >> and snubbed by his own party. chris christie gets the cold shoulder, left off the list for a key republican event. >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "early start." i'm john berman. i feel like i haven't seen you in days. >> you haven't. good morning to you. good morning to you. thanks for being with us. it's tuesday, february 26th. it is 5:00 a.m. in the east. happening right now, it is a raging blizzard, blasting the southern plains. leaving large parts of texas and oklahoma buried under more than a foot of snow. roads are impassable, drivers are stranded. this picture was sent to us from a reporter philip prince. a trucker stuck on interstate 40 about 50 miles east of amarillo. look at the conditions there. he says the highway has been shut down. he has been stuck for about eight hours when he finally took that picture. two people have been killed, one on an icy road in kansas, another at a home in oklahoma where t
have been worse in the buros. all the major roadways are plowed and open and the city streets should be cleared by the end of the day. overnight, a foot of snow dumped on the big apple. some parts of eastern long island got up to 30 inches of snow. >> is any now a picture of what is happening in the weather world. gwen tolbert has been tracking the latest on the storm and changes in our forecast here. >> reporter: we dodged the bullet on this one and into the northeast, as you mentioned and taking a major hit. we'll look at radar and show you what is happening now can you see areas of northeastern maine dealing with a lot of snow there. other than that, it's dealing with the canadian maritime. other than, that not much is happening. the winds are strong, however, and that is causing an issue. as we go to the weather map, let's look at what is happening here at home. the satellite radar composite showing you we have some clearing skies as a ridge of high pressure starts building in for us and there is not a lot of activity. did we ever deal with strong winds? thing are improving searc
killed while shielding his friends from a gang members spraying fire on a city bus. his friend is here today marcus norris, hit in the face by a bullet that came through the wall of his house. thank god he survived. we are glad to have him here today. a true american hero who dedicated his life to serving his country and his community, killed by gang members with a straw purchase gone. i attended his funeral service. the officer's family is here, and his sister will testify today. there are many more in this room today whose lives and families have been changed by gun violence. i would like to ask the friends and family of the victims of gun violence to please stand. look about his room. understand that the debate we have before us has affected so many lives. thank you all for being here today. as we conduct this debate and honor your loved ones who are no longer with us, we know that we have to act. thank you for joining us at this hearing. senator cruz. >> thank you, mr. chairman. let me say it is a particular honor to serve as ranking member on this committee with you and a particul
with the help of her 6-year-old son, and it sure has paid off as she hase welcome from new york city tammy austin. so pretty. >> thank you. [kiss] meredith: good to see you. all right, tammy, we discovered yesterday that your son is a fan of this show, he's been helping you prepare, that you are also a risk taker... >> apparently. meredith: not afraid to make some guesses. well, they certainly paid off. >> they did yesterday. meredith: but at what point do you think, "i probably won't be risky" at some point in this game? >> well...usually my line is that if it doesn't take a lot of preparation or endurance or training, i'll do it. meredith: uh-huh. >> i've been kind of training for this one by collecting useless knowledge for a long time. meredith: ha ha! >> we'll see, you know? it's ok. it's actually not useless anymore. meredith: and i know you can use the money. it's been flooding in your apartment recently, so... >> yes. we had 4 feet of water in my apartment yesterday. meredith: oh, my god. >> so i had no hot water this morning. so i'm here. it's a nice day to be on tv when you can't
will replace him. following developments live from vatican city. what have be learned in the news conference? >> reporter: good morning, john. in fact, father frederico lombardi is holding the news conference, and providing a few details. not a whole lot new. a few bits of information that are helping us to figure out what is going to happen here in the next few days. one of the things he said is that as you mentioned that there was no specific illness involved in the pope's decision to resign. he did say that the pope had had his pacemaker battery replaced recently. a normal operation, no problems. some of the italian press speculating that perhaps there was a problem with that operation. and another thing that they talked about was the idea that the pope's last general audience will be wednesday, the 27th of february and that will be the last big public audience before he resigned on the 28th, and i -- i'm willing to bet -- this is just speculation on my part, that most of the college of cardinals will want to be here for that. a chance to have a sendoff for the pope, a very public sendoff
. kansas city, digging out once again. and the heavy, wet snow, bringing down old trees. and creating a new danger, roof collapses. one man was killed after a roof buckled in oklahoma. in belton, missouri, a family narrowly made it out, after this wall came crashing down. >> it was like a big, huge salad bowl. that's when i realized, we have to get out. >> reporter: two hours west, in missouri's capital, jefferson city, the entire ceiling and front wall of this warehouse, destroyed. so, here at o'hare, and at many airports, it will be a day of playing catchup. and another busy day of digging out across the path of this storm. sam? >> alex, the middle of the country taking a wallop out of this storm system. as it continues to move east, there's still some snow left. we'll see maine, northern new york state, coming in with an additional six inches of snow there. we'll go through all of america's weather when we come back in a minute. elizabeth? >> sam, thank you so much. >>> and we're going to turn, now, to washington. and the grim countdown to the massive spending cuts that will kick in on f
, kansas, not nashville, tennessee. in kansas city, they picked up 9.2 inches of snowfall. you can still see it for areas like nebraska, minnesota and into wisconsin. chicago, you've picked up about .81 inches of snowfall. that's welcomed but still not a lot. looking at a wintry mix from this last storm system, bringing some of that through to west virginia, ohio, and down through the south our other story is going to be flooding. we'll talk more about that flooding over the next couple of days. see these numbers up towards areas like in minnesota, three inches of snow. down toward regions like tennessee, even into georgia, we're going to see potentially three to six inches of rainfall. you see a line of storms moving through and this is going to continue to pile up. and this means worry going to be dealing with a flood threat over the next couple of days. there's also a chance for some winter weather to move through parts of the northeast. it looks like some new watches and advisories were just issued. it looks like in some locations we could pick up about six inches of snowfall. some l
doing? so i used my citi thankyou card to pick up some accessories. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wouldn't need new shoes? and with all the points i've been earning, i was able to get us a flight to our favorite climbing spot even on a holiday weekend. ♪ things are definitely looking up. [ male announcer ] with no blackout dates, you can use your citi thankyou points to travel whenever you want. visit citi.com/thankyoucards to apply. by the armful? by the barrelful? the carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> his final general audience before his resignation takes effect tomorrow. tens of thousands of people gathered in st. peter's square, with what will be one of the last public appearances. once again, welcome, everyone, joining us on set. "new york" m john heilemann. and in nashville, pulitzer prize-winning historian and our resident theologian, jon meacham. jon, why don't we stick with these live pictures. and i'll start out with a question to
york city, take newman's postal truck and they could save then on transportation, and drive the bottles and cans to michigan where they pay higher for the recycle rate. >> alisyn: ten cents per bottle. >> clayton: and this ended up being a funny episode. take a look. >> and mi 10 cents. >> that's michigan, michigan you get 10 cents. >> 10 cents? >> yeah, wait a minute, 5 cents here and 10 cents there, you could round up bottles here and-- >> that doesn't work. >> you overload your inventory and blow your margins on gasoline, it doesn't work. >> you're not talking that michigan deposit bottle scam. >> no, no, i'm off that. >> you are. >> oh, yeah, everywhich way, couldn't crunch the numbers, drove me crazy. >> alisyn: life is now imitating art. or that was art imitating life, i don't know, this is happening in michigan people from other states are driving in their bottles to collect and it's bankrupting michigan. >> tucker: well, basically eastern michigan is bankrupt anyway, this is what you get passing a dumb law like this, aluminum and glass, are valuable for licensing, and you don't
new york city. caller: good morning. what you just read in the article, it makes the case why religious institutions ought not to be tax-exempt and get all the tax breaks that they do. they are using their tax breaks to hire lawyers that are costing the taxpayers even more money to basically just have a normal secular society. this issue of birth control, the rest of the world is laughing at us that we are even controverting over it. it should not even be an issue on the table. again, the tax-exempt status for religious institutions, i do not know if there are organizations that are trying to repeal this tax-exempt status, but i never really heard of a program on c- span about it, but these organizations, these religious institutions -- it is the tax breaks they get. host: nick from fairview, tennessee. on the independent line. caller: this is a ploy. socialists like the kennedys and obama, they will vilify -- if they cannot get it right, kruschev said, we will take two steps forward, and one step backward. we no longer live under a constitutional republic. liberals claim that
. >> this is a shocking, shocking discovery out of kansas city, missouri. a teenager found chained to a pipe in the basement by his own parents. local police found the 17-year-old after responding to a tip from a neighbor who suspected he was being abused. the special needs teen told police he had been locked up down tlp since september. casey wine is live for us in kansas city, missouri. casey, what do we know about this? >> reporter: well, we know this is a very horrific incident, according to the police report, hard to imagine that a 17-year-old young man, apparently a mentally challenged young man would be locked in a basement and handcuffed for much of the time to a steel pole since september. now, let me show you where this took place. you can see the house behind me. down at ground level you can see that sliver of light. that is the basement where the police report says they found this 17-year-old teen handcuffed to a steel support pole. they say when they found him, he was on the ground in a fetal position and they said that the first words he spoke to them were "i didn't do anything
the most of the guns had rested because the government of the city of new orleans did not give a never mind and left the guns in an exposed condition and in rather extreme humidity that they experience there, so the guns or ruined. oh, too bad. host: what statement did gun owners of america make after sandy hook? guest: following sandy hook, gun owners of america was pretty outraged. we pointed out that the politicians have to accept some blame for what happened, for having facilitated what happened in sandy hook. all of the mass murders in our country in the last 20 years with one exception have occurred in legally-required gun-free zones. these are places where you just are not allowed to legally have a gun. and whether it was a mall in utah, whether it was a theater in colorado, or whether it was at this school -- typically it has been at schools, that is where these mass murders occurred. our response that was let's get rid of the laws that require people to be disarmed, precisely in places where the mass murders have occurred. host: harrison, nebraska, good morning. caller: hello, the
're working with states and cities who have filed lawsuits. and the other way to get that information is the result of lawsuits that have been filed, discrimination lawsuits. so that is some place you can start. but when you have national organizations who are willing, particularly black police officers, who are willing to step out on the front lines to give you that data and that information, i would encourage you to communicate with them. >> all right. well, this has been an extraordinarily informative panel and you see by the testimony so to speak of these experts that this is a vital and critical problem that we have to confront. and it has real consequences on actually existing people, on flesh and blood folk, most of whom are ours. whether black or latino or asian or indigenous people or the like. the reality is all of this intellectual and academic and cerebrally intense stuff we're talking about has application. that's no reason to dislodge the centrality of the academic and the abstract and the theory because the reality is, given what this panel has spoken about, and profess
of thoughtfulness that needs to happen, rather than arbitrary cuts. host: a lot more stories about your largest city, detroit, and its economic issues. what is the future of that city? guest: detroit has many great things going on, young people moving in, some great projects going on. the challenge in detroit is city government. it is not a recent issue. there are good people in the recent administration. this goes back for decades. the city government is unsustainable in terms of its finances. it needs to provide better services. we have had a review team looking at the finances. one of the question it asks is, do we need to take additional steps to get detroit's finances together? -- working better? oddly partner with the city to get that happening? detroit will be a great city again. that is critically important for the future of michigan. caller: what is happening in detroit is disgraceful. look. you run for office. you get in, you get that power, and all good ideas run out of your mind. it seems like all of the government, including state, is bought and sold to the highest bidder. you start off
powering some of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. >> announcer: you never know when, but thieves can steal your identity and turn your life upside down. >> hi. >> hi. you know, i can save you 15% today if you open up a charge card account with us. >> you just read my mind. >> announcer: just one little piece of information and they can open bogus accounts, stealing your credit, your money and ruining your reputation. that's why you need lifelock to relentlessly protect what matters most... [beeping...] helping stop crooks before your identity is attacked. and now you can have the most comprehensive identity theft protection available today... lifelock ultimate. so for protection you just can't get anywhere else, get lifelock ultimate. >> i didn't know how serious identity theft was until i lost my credit and eventually i lost my home. >> announcer: crit monitoring is not enough, because it tells you after the fact, sometimes as much as 30 days later. with lifelock, as soon as our network spots a threat to your identity, you'll get a proactive risk alert, protecting you before you
, in some of the larger cities and then some smaller independent operators in smaller cities. a good part of the traffic has been people who stream it online. that is pretty dedicated following. in fact, with the very large online content it was 40% of that comes from the united states. >> host: so that is the appetite? >> guest: there is appetite clearly. online streamers. >>ing are fresh should have content to have people cross over. >> al-jazeera purchased current tv in december last year. just month 1/2 ago. how about expanding the american audience. who will you reach right now? >> potentially estimated 50 million viewers. if you talk going 4 1/2 million homes to 50 million homes, obviously a great leap forrd -- forward. one of the things we fought for years was distribution in the meshes. this opens some eyeballs to us and we hope we'll give people a chance to see our coverage, to sample it from those that haven't seen it and provide another platform for the core audience that we already have. >> here are some facts about al-jazeera english channel. it is a 24 hour global news netwo
. in the city of milwaukee, they have involved 112 private schools in the program, nearly 5000 students. $6,500 per student. the total cost, i assume annual, 164 -- $154 million. >> it depends on how you look at it. milwaukee past its first voucher program in 1989. it served as a model for a lot of other state voucher programs across the country. it serves over 24,000 students. there was a study that came out a couple years ago by the state that found vouchers were performing at the same level as traditional public schools in milwaukee. a more recent study out of the university of arkansas showed positive results for students with vouchers. i believe the program has been shown to offer pretty strong results in terms of graduation rates, but the milwaukee voucher program has been held up as the model, and the opinions of it will break down exactly along the lines of a voucher programs all over. clearly, governor walker believes if parents are buying into this program and it is proving popular, it will prove popular in other school districts around wisconsin. we will see if the legislature is
advantage of it, without unduly exposing it to our adversaries. let me move on to private city and civil liberties. anytime you're talking about sharing the information, sharing information with respect to cybersecurity, you have to be conscious of privacy and civil liberties and you have to make sure those are protected. that has been a priority of the administration and it continues to be so. so, while there are perhaps fewer concerns in the executive order because the focus is on sharing information outward, we have established a robust, oversight regime and in particular we have highlighted the fips. that is the government speak, right? if i don't insert an acronym every two or three minutes it is just not fun. the fips are the fair information practice principles. these date back to the 1970's when they were developed dealing with health records. essentially it is what are the principles you need to use in considering privacy with respect to information? so we think it's important we establish these as a one of the principles that we're going to follow with respect to sharing inform
to expand the voucher program. in the city of milwaukee, they have involved in the voucher program 112 private schools. almost 35,000 students. the total costs overall is 150 $4000. 30 eight percent comes from public school funds. another 62% of general revenue in the state. -- 38% comes from public school funds. another 62% comes from general revenue in the state shou. guest: acer does a model for a lot of voucher -- it served as a model for a lot of voucher programs around the country. states found that students performed at about the same level as traditional public schools in milwaukee. in a recent study out of the university of arkansas shows positive results for students with vouchers. i believe the program has been shown pretty strong results in terms of graduation rates. the milwaukee voucher is held up as a model. the opinions of it will break down pretty much along the lines of voucher programs all over. governor walker believes that parents are buying into the program and it is proving popular. it might prove popular in other school districts around wisconsin. host: we are t
a city in shelby county. we don't need the voting rights act. as a result of section two litigation they created council districts. a black representative was elected for 20 years. suddenly, as a result of the redistricting, they reduced the black population from 70% to 29%. they don't pre-clear it. they go ahead with the election. the justice department has to do an enforcement action to stop them from undermining the minorities to elect. it happened in 2008, not 1965. >> this is not ancient history. bar brarks i'm going to give you the last ten seconds because i know you have a call to rally to protect voting rights happening on the steps of the supreme court. >> the civil rights community because of cases being held are heard on february 27th, this coming wednesday. they have called for people around the country to come and to show their support for the voting rights act and not surprisingly people are interested, very determined. we understand what's at stake here. as americans, we know that the fight here is opened a future to this country. it's over weather or not we are going
bureaucracy can afford to bear the brunt of these cuts, not our military, not communities like lake city or mayo or newberry or middleberg, florida. i'm working with my friend from georgia, congressman doug collins, on the new freshmen regulatory reform working group, to help show exactly where some of these cuts are and help businesses do what they do best, they grow the economy and they create jobs, bringing in more revenues to our government. we need and we will show the president and the american people that we can cut wasteful spending without hurting kids, our seniors and that we can make responsible cuts that do not put our national security at risk. and not add to the heavy tax burden of hardworking americans that they're already carrying. it was a shame that the president and the senate have avoided working with the house in real budgeting process. i look forward to working with all my colleagues on resupporting -- restoring faith to the american people and bringing order back to this process. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back the balance of my time. mr. westmoreland: i t
of the biggest natural gas projects in the world. enough power for a city the size of singapore for 50 years. what's it going to do to the planet? natural gas is the cleanest conventional fuel there is. we've got to be smart about this. it's a smart way to go. ♪ watch this -- alakazam! ♪ [ male announcer ] staples has always made getting office supplies easy. ♪ another laptop? don't ask. disappear! abracadabra! alakazam! [ male announcer ] and now we're making it easier to get everything for your business. and for my greatest trick! enough! [ male announcer ] because whatever you need, we'll have it or find it, and get it to you fast. staples. that was easy. schwab bank was built with all the value and convenience tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 investors want. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like no atm fees, worldwide. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and no nuisance fees. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus deposit checks with mobile deposit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and manage your cash and investments tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with schwab's mobile app. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 no wonder schwab bank has grown to over 70 billion in assets
city tennessee, or public in line. caller: yes. i want to make a comment. i think obama and handle -- hagel percent ace two state solution. is that correct or not? guest: at some point, that is their ultimate goal, yes. caller: don't you think that would make the situation worse, they are trying to divide it? the bible says that god is against that. dividing the land of israel. guest: i think that is a whole separate show on what to do in that region. it is far too complex to get into at this point. senator hagel has been very clear that he supports the president's approach to the region. host: talk about when senators are getting prepared. do they get a briefing book? how is that done? guest: they get some of that from the administration. the committee takes a set -- slightly different approach. the committee staff will also look at that. it is not the committee's job to rubber stamp the nominees. they will take their own look and prepare their own materials for specific members that they asked but also generally for the committee. certainly in an instance like this, i think the r
popular. but he does come across sometimes as the ultimate nanny mayor. nanny state nanny city, if you will. i mean remember, he's the guy that said no smoking in the bars and restaurants. no smoke even outside -- have to keep a certain distance away of bars and restaurants. he banned msg. he made the restaurants put their calorie counts on the menus and he's the guy most recently said you can't buy any soda larger than a 16 ounce drink. right? so all of that kind of stuff yeah people say he's kind of gone too far. by the way i think those are all good measures. should the government be doing that? probably but it's still a pain in the ass, let's say. on guns, he has really stood up, tall and straight! i say that for a man who's probably only about five foot tall. he has been great. so he just got tired of the fact -- he's long been a supporter of tough gun control measures and tough gun safety measures. but he got tired of the fact and frustrated when there were so many politicians who might want to do something about gun control but were afraid to because of the nra and the political
a bipartisan group of city elected officials, business leaders, and community advocates gave me a message to bring back the congress. i'm proud of their joint effort and i'm proud of their service to our communities. i consider it a privilege to deliver their message. in our state, we are concerned that congress will turn the clock back on arizona's hard work and progress. we are worried about hardworking families losing their jobs. as the granddaughter of a world war ii veteran and proud sister of a gunner's mate in the u.s. navy today, i remember every day that it is our moral duty to do right by the men and women in uniform who risked their lives to keep us safe. avoid the see questions tration should not be about partisanship or finger pointing. it's about jobs. it's that simple. i stand with the dean of our state's delegation, senator john mccain, when i say this sequester will be devastating for arizona. it's bad for hardworking americans and it turns a blind eye to my state's proud effort and proven perseverance. i affirm my commitment to working with anybody who is willing to put
and dinners. and my governor will in louisiana must have taken 20 trips to different states and cities during the republican convention that was going on and he still lost. i'm independent. i didn't really care who won. i'm independent. i feel like as republican is for the rich white your democrat for the poor blacks independents is for everybody. i don't care. the -- host: the question the specific question for our guest? guest: the specific question is why do you have to cut spending that's going to help the poor and help the people that's in need in health care and help people that get into trouble and all that? guest: one of the thing that is you'll see if you look at the budgets of states across the country, certainly my states, most across the country over the last many years the amount of money that we spend on health care specifically which i think is what the caller was asking about has been increasing significantly. and it's a challenge. and because of that and the fact that we have limited resources at the state level unlike at the federal level where they can just essentially borr
's from huffington post. to bonnie, let's go to our republican line next, to nicholas in new york city. nicholas, welcome. >> caller: well, it's great to be here, and thank you, and i'll try to make it brief, and let me apologize to the others waiting on line. i just, very quickly, you know, i came here as a child in 1966, and they moved us up to the bronx. we came here through red cross auspices. and, you know, my dad and mom worked two and three jobs, eventually they bought real estate because they saved their money. we were subsistence farmers back home -- >> host: nicholas, where -- where was back home? you said you came here in '66. where was back home? >> caller: montenegro today on border of albanian on the coast of adriatic sea. we were albanian catholics. in fact, we were a minority amongst other minorities, but we were the minority. >> host: back to our question, how do you think these budget cuts will affect you? >> guest: well, i've been watching this thing, and it seems like i've seen this movie before. now, i've worked very hard as my mom and daddied, as my brothers do, a
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)